Canadian Grand Prix 2019: History, Numbers, Stats and Facts

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Round seven of the 2019 Formula One World Championship features an interruption in the European run of events, with the action moving to Montreal's Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, home of the Canadian Grand Prix.

The Circuit Gilles Villeneuve mixes elements of a permanent and a street circuit, offering an exciting combination of low grip and high speeds around the 4.361km track.

Set on the artificial Ile Notre-Dame in the city's St Lawrence River, the nature of the circuit is informed by the elongated shape of the low-lying island, with a sequence of short straights punctuated by chicanes running up the western side, followed by a hairpin and a long back straight down the eastern edge before a final chicane leading onto the main straight.

This configuration compels teams to sacrifice downforce in favour of straight-line speed, though the faster corners at Turns 1-2 and approaching the hairpin temper this. Thus, a set-up somewhere in medium-low part of the downforce range is required.

The layout of the circuit also places a high demand on brake cooling, with a sequence of heavy stops into the slow corners, and very little recovery time in between. Those slow corners also place a premium on having a car with good traction on exit.

Despite being a very different circuit, Pirelli offers the same compounds in Montreal as it did in Monaco, with the three softest tyres available. The different demands of the circuit, however, see more variation in the allocation, with the Ferrari drivers each taking five sets of the Medium (C4) compound, compared with just one set last time out.

Approaching one-third distance in the 2019 season, Mercedes' stranglehold on the top two podium positions has finally been broken, though the Silver Arrows still increased their advantage in Monaco.

They now leading the Constructors' Championship with 257 points to Ferrari's 139. In the Drivers' Championship, consecutive victories have helped Lewis Hamilton eke out a small lead of 17 points over Mercedes team-mate Valtteri Bottas.

CIRCUIT NOTES

► A drain has been added to the inside of Turn 2.

► There are new concrete walls and debris fencing running from Turn 4 through to Turn 10.

► The opening after Turn 10 on drivers right has been significantly widened and extended.

► The configuration of the wall to the drivers' right at Turn 13 has been modified and the guardrail replaced with a concrete wall.

► Turn 14 has a new concrete wall and debris fence.

► Additional CCTV cameras have been installed to allow the entire track to be monitored.

► The pit building has been demolished and rebuilt.

DRS ZONE

► There will be three DRS zones in Canada. The first zone has a detection point 15m after Turn 5 and an activation point 95m after Turn 7. The other two zones share a detection point 110m before Turn 9, with activation points 155m before Turn 12 and 70m after Turn 14.

Canadian Grand Prix Hisotry

The Canadian Grand Prix is an annual auto race held in Canada since 1961. It has been part of the Formula One World Championship since 1967.

It was first staged at Mosport Park in Bowmanville, Ontario as a sports car event, before alternating between Mosport and Circuit Mont-Tremblant, Quebec after Formula One took over the event.

After 1971, safety concerns led to the Grand Prix moving permanently to Mosport. In 1978, after similar safety concerns with Mosport, the Canadian Grand Prix moved to its current home at Circuit Gilles Villeneuve on Notre Dame Island in Montreal.

In 2005, the Canadian Grand Prix was the most watched Formula One GP in the world. The race was also the third most watched sporting event worldwide, behind the first place Super Bowl XXXIX and the UEFA Champions League Final.

Preceding the qualifying session in 2014, the Grand Prix organizers announced they had agreed to a 10-year extension to keep the Canadian Grand Prix at Circuit Gilles Villeneuve through 2024.

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Canadian Grand Prix, Round Seven of the 2019 Formula 1 season

Circuit name: Gilles Villeneuve

Race laps: 70

Circuit length: 4.361 km (2.709 mi)

Race length: 305.270 km (189.694 mi)

Number of corners: 14 (8 Right, 6 Left)

Circuit direction: Clockwise

Distance from pole to First braking zone: 159.154 m

Pole position 2018: Sebastian Vettel - Ferrari 1:10.764

Pole position side: Left

Pit lane length under speed limit control: 404.2 m

Drive-through time at 80 km/h: 18.189s

Lap time at full throttle: 64%

Lap distance at full throttle: 76%

Gear changes per lap: 52

Braking events (>2g): 6

Heavy braking events (4g): 4

Fuel consumption: High

Maximum lateral G-force: 3.7G (T5)

Maximum speed: 315.50 km/h

Track evolution (P1 – Qualifying): Low

DRS zones: T7-8 / T12-13 / T14-1

Key overtaking opportunities: T1 / T10 / T13

Race lap record: 1:13.622 Rubens Barrichello - Ferrari 2004

Absolute lap record: Sebastian Vettel 2017 - Ferrari (Q3) 1:10.764

Pirelli used compounds: Hard C3 (White) – Medium C4 (Yellow) – Soft C5 (Red)

Circuit Gilles Villeneuve

Pirelli used compounds

P Zero White hard – less grip, less wear (used for long-race stints) - The C3 version will be used, with a working range between 105-135 degrees Celsius (221-275 degrees Fahrenheit)

P Zero Yellow medium – more grip, medium wear (used for shorter-race stints and for initial portion of qualifying) - The C4 version will be used, with a working range between 90-120 degrees Celsius (194-248 degrees Fahrenheit)

P Zero Red soft – highest amount of grip, highest amount of wear (used for qualifying and select race situations) - The C5 version will be used, with a working range between 85-115 degrees Celsius (185-239 degrees Fahrenheit)

Teams/Drivers compounds choice

Nbr

Driver

Hard C3

Medium C4

Soft C5

44

Lewis Hamilton

1

4

8

77

Valtteri Bottas

2

3

8

5

Sebastian Vettel

1

5

7

16

Charles Leclrec

1

5

7

33

Max Verstappen

2

4

7

10

Pierre Gasly

2

4

7

3

Daniel Ricciardo

1

4

8

27

Nico Hulkenberg

2

3

8

20

Kevin Magnussen

2

3

8

8

Romain Grosjean

1

4

8

55

Carlos Sainz

2

2

9

4

Lando Norris

2

2

9

11

Sergio Perez

2

2

9

18

Lance Stroll

2

2

9

7

Kimi Raikkonen

1

3

9

99

Antonio Giovinazzi

2

2

9

26

Daniil Kvyat

1

4

8

23

Alexander Albon

1

4

8

63

George Russell

3

3

7

88

Robert Kubica

2

3

8

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THE CIRCUIT FROM A TYRE POINT OF VIEW:

  • Montréal is a semi-permanent track with smooth asphalt, using roads in the Parc Jean Drapeau that are open to the public for recreational activities during the rest of the year. This means that it’s especially ‘green’ and slippery at the start of the grand prix weekend, with a high degree of track evolution as the surface gets rubbered in.
  • Canada is all about traction and braking, so getting heat into the front tyres is part of the challenge. There is no much run-off, so safety cars are a reasonably common occurrence, which of course can affect strategy.
  • Weather is variable, but cool temperatures and rain are quite common at this time of the year (in 2011, red flag interruptions because of rain let to the longest grand prix in F1 history, lasting more than four hours). As a result of the cool weather and track conditions, some degree of graining can be expected, especially at the start of the weekend.
  • Unlike Monaco, there’s plenty of opportunity to overtake in Canada, with a much higher average speed, long straights, and plenty of heavy braking areas. This makes it a very tough circuit on brakes: something that the teams always have to look out for.
  • There was a mix of strategies used last year, with most drivers choosing a one-stopper, also influenced by an early safety car. The top two at the end (and on the grid) didn’t start the race on the softest available compound, and that might be the case again this weekend. Sebastian Vettel (Ferrari) and Valtteri Bottas (Mercedes) began on the ultrasoft – the approximate equivalent of the current C4 – before switching to the supersoft, which has been deleted from this year’s line-up.

MARIO ISOLA - HEAD OF CAR RACING

"Broadly speaking, our nomination for Canada is about the same as last year, when the hypersoft also made its second appearance of the year after Monaco. The main difference is that the hardest compound available this weekend is a bit harder than last year, and there is no equivalent of the supersoft in the 2019 range, so the choices are more spread out. While we have the same nomination as Monaco, a few of the teams have compared Montréal more with Baku – where we made a harder selection - because of the higher speeds, longer straights, and the challenge of balancing tyre temperatures across the front and rear of the car. Montréal is also a race that contains plenty of variety, in terms of strategy, on-track action and weather. The teams always go into it not knowing quite what to expect, so it’s especially important to accumulate as much tyre data as possible in order to be able to make an informed reaction to changing circumstances".

MONTREAL MINIMUM STARTING PRESSURES AND EOS CAMBER LIMIT (SLICKS)

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Canadian Grand Prix Winners 1966 – 2018

Year

Driver

Constructor

Location

2018

Sebastian Vettel

Ferrari

Circuit Gilles Villeneuve

2017

 Lewis Hamilton

Mercedes

2016

 Lewis Hamilton

Mercedes

2015

 Lewis Hamilton

Mercedes

2014

 Daniel Ricciardo

Red Bull-Renault

2013

 Sebastian Vettel

Red Bull-Renault

2012

 Lewis Hamilton

McLaren-Mercedes

2011

 Jenson Button

McLaren-Mercedes

2010

 Lewis Hamilton

McLaren-Mercedes

2009

Not held

2008

 Robert Kubica

BMW Sauber

Circuit Gilles Villeneuve

2007

 Lewis Hamilton

McLaren-Mercedes

2006

 Fernando Alonso

Renault

2005

 Kimi Räikkönen

McLaren-Mercedes

2004

 Michael Schumacher

Ferrari

2003

 Michael Schumacher

Ferrari

2002

 Michael Schumacher

Ferrari

2001

 Ralf Schumacher

Williams-BMW

2000

 Michael Schumacher

Ferrari

1999

 Mika Häkkinen

McLaren-Mercedes

1998

 Michael Schumacher

Ferrari

1997

 Michael Schumacher

Ferrari

1996

 Damon Hill

Williams-Renault

1995

 Jean Alesi

Ferrari

1994

 Michael Schumacher

Benetton-Ford

1993

 Alain Prost

Williams-Renault

1992

 Gerhard Berger

McLaren-Honda

1991

 Nelson Piquet

Benetton-Ford

1990

 Ayrton Senna

McLaren-Honda

1989

 Thierry Boutsen

Williams-Renault

1988

 Ayrton Senna

McLaren-Honda

1987

Not held

1986

 Nigel Mansell

Williams-Honda

Circuit Gilles Villeneuve

1985

 Michele Alboreto

Ferrari

1984

 Nelson Piquet

Brabham-BMW

1983

 René Arnoux

Ferrari

1982

 Nelson Piquet

Brabham-BMW

1981

 Jacques Laffite

Ligier-Matra

Circuit Île Notre-Dame

1980

 Alan Jones

Williams-Ford

1979

 Alan Jones

Williams-Ford

1978

 Gilles Villeneuve

Ferrari

1977

 Jody Scheckter

Wolf-Ford

Mosport Park

1976

 James Hunt

McLaren-Ford

1975

Not held

1974

 Emerson Fittipaldi

McLaren-Ford

Mosport Park

1973

 Peter Revson

McLaren-Ford

1972

 Jackie Stewart

Tyrrell-Ford

1971

 Jackie Stewart

Tyrrell-Ford

1970

 Jacky Ickx

Ferrari

Mont-Tremblant

1969

 Jacky Ickx

Brabham-Ford

Mosport Park

1968

 Denny Hulme

McLaren-Ford

Mont-Tremblant

1967

 Jack Brabham

Brabham-Repco

Mosport Park

1966

 Mark Donohue

Lola-Chevrolet

Mosport Park

XPB 41947 1200px 

Multiple Winners (Drivers)

# of wins

Driver

Years

7

Michael Schumacher

1994, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004

6

Lewis Hamilton

2007, 2010, 2012, 2015, 2016, 2017

3

Nelson Piquet

1982, 1984, 1991

2

Jacky Ickx

1969, 1970

Jackie Stewart

1971, 1972

Alan Jones

1979, 1980

Ayrton Senna

1988, 1990

Sebastian Vettel

2014, 2018

 

Multiple Winners (Constructors)

# of wins

Constructor

Years

14

Ferrari

1963, 1964, 1970, 1978, 1983, 1985, 1995, 
1997, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2018

McLaren

1968, 1973, 1974, 1976, 1988, 1990, 1992, 
1999, 2005, 2007, 2010, 2011, 2012

7

Williams

1979, 1980, 1986, 1989, 1993, 1996, 2001

4

Brabham

1967, 1969, 1982, 1984

 

Mercedes

2015, 2016, 2017

2

Lotus

1961, 1962

Tyrrell

1971, 1972

Benetton

1991, 1994

Red Bull

2013, 2014

 XPB 672247 1200px

Numbers and Facts

Most wins (driver) 7 Michael Schumacher 1994 – 97 – 98 – 2000 – 02 – 03 – 04

Most wins (constructor) 13 McLaren (most recent 2012 and wins here = 9 which is bettered by Ferrari at CGV [11])

Wins from pole position 23 (1969 – 71 – 74 – 76 – 79 – 83 – 84 – 86 – 88 – 90 – 93 – 94 – 96 – 97 – 00 – 06 – 07 – 10 – 13 – 15 – 16 – 17 – 18)

Lowest grid for past winner 10 Jacques Laffite – 1981

Most recent 1-2 finish 2017 Mercedes (Lewis Hamilton-Valtteri Bottas)

Most emphatic win (here) 1 lap 1968 – Dennis Hulme- Bruce McLaren (Here = 42.029s in 1983 – Rene Arnoux-Eddie Cheever

Closest winning margin 0.174s / 2000 – Michael Schumacher-Rubens Barrichello

Rain-affected races 6 (1971 – 73 – 81 – 89 – 90 – 2000 – 2011)

Safety Car-affected races 15 (1973 – 97 – 98 – 99 – 2001 – 02 – 05 – 06 – 07 – 08 – 11 – 12 – 16 – 17 – 18)

2-hour rule shortened races 2 (1981 – 89)

Most podiums (driver) 12 Michael Schumacher 1992 – 93 – 94 – 97 – 98 – 2000 – 01 – 02 – 03 – 04 – 05 – 06

Most podiums (constructor) 34 Ferrari (Most recent: 2018)

Most pole positions (driver) 6 Michael Schumacher 1994 – 95 – 97 – 99 – 2000 – 01 and Hamilton 2007 – 08 – 10 – 15 – 16 – 17

Most pole positions (constructor) 11 McLaren 1972 – 74 – 76 – 88 – 89 – 90 – 92 – 98 – 2007 – 08 – 10

What Happened last race here?

The grid got away largely without incident from the line, but in turn 5, Brendon Hartley and Lance Stroll collided, forcing their immediate retirement and the deployment of the safety car.

At the restart, Sergio Pérez touched Sainz, forcing Pérez off the track, losing positions. On Lap 18, Daniel Ricciardo overcut Lewis Hamilton for the fourth position. On lap 46, Fernando Alonso retired from the race with an exhaust issue.

Race officials erroneously directed model Winnie Harlow to wave the chequered flag before race leader Vettel completed lap 69 (the scheduled penultimate lap) and therefore the results were taken from lap 68, according to the Formula 1 sporting regulations article 43.2.

This meant that Ricciardo's successively faster fastest laps on laps 69 and 70 were voided, and Sergio Pérez's overtake on Kevin Magnussen for 13th did not stand.

2018 Race Classification

Pos.

Driver

Constructor

Time/Retired

Grid

1

Sebastian Vettel

Ferrari

1:28:31.377

1

2

Valtteri Bottas

Mercedes

+7.376

2

3

Max Verstappen

Red Bull Racing-TAG Heuer

+8.36

3

4

Daniel Ricciardo

Red Bull Racing-TAG Heuer

+20.892

6

5

Lewis Hamilton

Mercedes

+21.559

4

6

Kimi Räikkönen

Ferrari

+27.184

5

7

Nico Hülkenberg

Renault

+1 lap

7

8

Carlos Sainz Jr.

Renault

+1 lap

9

9

Esteban Ocon

Force India-Mercedes

+1 lap

8

10

Charles Leclerc

Sauber-Ferrari

+1 lap

13

11

Pierre Gasly

Scuderia Toro Rosso-Honda

+1 lap

19

12

Romain Grosjean

Haas-Ferrari

+1 lap

20

13

Kevin Magnussen

Haas-Ferrari

+1 lap

11

14

Sergio Pérez

Force India-Mercedes

+1 lap

10

15

Marcus Ericsson

Sauber-Ferrari

+2 laps

18

16

Stoffel Vandoorne

McLaren-Renault

+2 laps

15

17

Sergey Sirotkin

Williams-Mercedes

+2 laps

17

Ret

Fernando Alonso

McLaren-Renault

Exhaust

14

Ret

Brendon Hartley

Scuderia Toro Rosso-Honda

Collision

12

Ret

Lance Stroll

Williams-Mercedes

Collision

16

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Did you know?

DRIVERS

Lewis Hamilton has won 32.8% of all GP he’s started (77 wins from 235 starts) and is in the top 10 drivers races to win ratio of all-time. Here’s how he compares:- Fangio 47.0%, 2. Ascari 40.6%, 3. Clark 34.7%, 4.L.Hamilton 32.8%, 5. M. Schumacher 29.7%, 6. Ja. Stewart 27.2%, 7. Prost 25.6%, 8. A. Senna 25.5%, Moss 24.2%, 10. Vettel 23.1% (52/225)

Hamilton is the 10th most experienced (WC) Grand Prix driver of all-time in terms of number of races started (235). Next on the list is 9th-best DC (246). The most

experienced driver of all-time is Rubens Barrichello (325).

Hamilton needs a podium result in all 21 races this season if he is to equal Michael Schumacher’s all-time record of 155 F1 podiums

Hamilton can beat or equal a number of Canadian Grand Prix all-time records this weekend. A win would be his 7th and would equal Michael Schumacher.

Pole would be his 7th here and beat the record he currently shares with Schumacher. If he leads at least a lap on Sunday it will be the 10th Canadian Grand Prix he has led which would equal Schumacher’s record

Valtteri Bottas’s podium in Monaco F1 was his 36th in F1 and beat the F1 career podium total of Juan-Manuel Fangio

Sebastian Vettel could on Sunday lead a Grand Prix for the 100th time in his career. He has to date led 99 (Grand Prix)

Max Verstappen’s next podium in F1 will be his 25th and will beat Sir Stirling Moss

A win for Charles Leclerc would be the first for a Monegasque driver in the F1 World Championship and even a second place result would be the best by a driver from Monaco in the Championship. A win though would not be the first in a Grandes Épreuves for a Monegasque driver. Louis Chiron holds that distinction for winning the 1949 French Grand Prix at Reims driving a Talbot-Lago almost 70 years ago (17 July 1949)

A finish in the points for Sergio Perez will be his 96th in F1 and equal the number of races Ayrton Senna finished in the points

CONSTRUCTORS

Mercedes scored their 106th F1 World Championship pole position in Monaco. The total is the 5th highest in the history of the championship. Mercedes’s next target is

4th-best Lotus with 107 pole positions. Top all-time is Ferrari with 220

The next front row lock-out for Mercedes will be their 63rd and beat the all-time record jointly held by them, Ferrari, McLaren and Williams

This year is the 50th F1 World Championship-qualifying Canadian Grand Prix

CANADIAN GRAND PRIX

This is the 50th Formula One World Championship Canadian Grand Prix. The race made its debut in 1967 when it was won by Jack Brabham. It was not on the calendar in 1975, 1987 or 2009.

The race moved to its current home in 1978. Originally named the Circuit Ile Notre-Dame, it became the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in 1982. The original home of the Canadian Grand Prix was Mosport Park where the race was held eight times, interrupted with grands prix at Circuit Mont-Tremblant in 1968 and 1970.

✪ McLaren are the most successful team in Canada with 13 victories, closely followed by Ferrari who have 12. Ferrari, however, are more successful at the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, with 11 of their victories coming at the current venue, compared to nine of McLaren's.

Michael Schumacher is the most successful driver at the Canadian Grand Prix with seven victories, winning for Benetton in 1994 and Ferrari in 1997, 1998, 2000, 2002-2004. Lewis Hamilton has the opportunity to equal that record this weekend. Hamilton took three victories (2007, 2010, 2012) for McLaren, and three in a row (2015-2017) for Mercedes. Sebastian Vettel is also a repeat winner of the Canadian Grand Prix, with victories for Red Bull (2013) and Ferrari (2018). Other winners in the current field are Kimi Raikkonen (2005), Robert Kubica (2008) and Daniel Ricciardo (2014).

Hamilton, Kubica and Ricciardo all took their debut F1 victory at this circuit. They share that distinction with Gilles Villeneuve (1978), Thierry Boutsen (1989) and Jean Alesi (1995). Driving for Ferrari, the 1995 Canadian Grand Prix was the only victory of AJesi's career. Kubica's win for BMW-Sauber remains his sole F1 victory to date.

Hamilton's 2007 win for McLaren came from his first pole. Five of Hamilton's six wins at the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve have come from pole, the exception being 2012, when he started P2.

19 of the 39 Grands Prix held on this circuit have been won from pole position,

including five of the last six. The outlier from that sequence is Ricciardo's 2014 victory for Red Bull Racing, which came from P6 on the grid. Jacques Laffite's victory for Ligier from P10 is the furthest back from which a winner has started at this circuit.

Torrential rain and a substantial red-flag delay contributed to the many entries the 2011 Canadian Grand Prix has in the record books. The race involved the most deployments by the Safety Car (six) and most pitstops by a winning driver (six for Jenson Button — including a drive-through for speeding behind the Safety Car). The two-hour red flag period extended the duration of the race to a record 4h4m39.537s and thus the misleading statistic of the lowest average winning race speed of 74.844kph / 46.506mph for Button.

There are Circuit Gilles Villeneuve debuts this weekend for Alex Albon, Antonio Giovinazzi, Lando Norris and George Russell, none of whom has completed a FP1 session or a junior single-seater race at this track.

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Driver’s Championship standing

Pos

Driver

Pts

1

Lewis Hamilton

137

2

Valtteri Bottas

120

3

Sebastian Vettel

82

4

Max Verstappen

78

5

Charles Leclerc

57

6

Pierre Gasly

32

7

Carlos Sainz Jr.

18

8

Kevin Magnussen

14

9

Sergio Pérez

13

10

Kimi Räikkönen

13

11

Lando Norris

12

12

Daniil Kvyat

9

13

Daniel Ricciardo

8

14

Alexander Albon

7

15

Nico Hülkenberg

6

16

Lance Stroll

4

17

Romain Grosjean

2

18

Antonio Giovinazzi

0

19

George Russell

0

20

Robert Kubica

0

 

Constructor’s Championship standing

Pos.

Team

Pts

1

Mercedes

257

2

Ferrari

139

3

Red Bull Racing Honda

110

4

Mclaren Renault

30

5

Racing Point Mercedes

17

6

Haas Ferrari

16

7

Scuderia Toro Rosso Honda

16

8

Renault

14

9

Alfa Romeo Racing  Ferrari

13

10

Williams Mercedes

0


Driver’s penalty points
:

Driver

Penalty points

Lance Stroll

8

Romain Grosjean

7

Max Verstappen

7

Sebastian Vettel

5

Valtteri Bottas

4

Sergio Perez

3

Nico Hulkenberg

3

Carlos Sainz

3

Pierre Gasly

3

Antonio Giovinazzi

3

Kimi Raikkonen

2

Daniil Kvyat

2

Daniel Ricciardo

2

Kevin Magnussen

1

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